Tag Archives: Eiseman Jewels Estate

Joys of Jade

A symbol of all that is good and precious in some cultures, jade is different than other types of valuable gems or precious metals. It is a metamorphic rock made up of tiny interlocking mineral crystals. The term “jade” actually refers to two separate gems: nephrite and jadeite. Modern gemologists use jade to describe both.

Jadeite comes in a wide range of beautiful colors: shades of green, yellow and reddish orange in addition to white, gray, black, brown and lavender. Nephrite’s colors range from translucent to opaque and can be light to dark green, yellow, brown, black, gray or white.

Ounce for ounce, jade is more valuable than gold — and that’s before you take into account the value of the piece’s antiquity. Jade is always appreciating in value.

Joys of Jade

Jade in Chinese Culture

“Gold has a price; jade is priceless.” —Chinese proverb

Nephrite was the first jade discovered in China, and it has been a symbol of status, spirituality, health and purity in Chinese culture for 9,000 years. Today, Chinese nephrite deposits are all but depleted, so most jade traded in modern China is jadeite. In a nod to tradition, however, every winning athlete’s medal at the 2008 Beijing Olympics was embedded with a piece of pure nephrite jade.

Why We Love Jade

The way it interacts with light: Jadeite’s structure scatters light. If properly cut, a white piece with a small green spot will make the gem appear completely green if lit from behind.

The way it differs from other gems: Due to the way jade interacts with light, it is rarely faceted. Even semi-transparent jade is usually fashioned into cabochons, beads or other styles. It’s soft enough to carve yet durable, so the stone can be cut in unusual ways. Add this to the fact that rough jade can be quite large, and the result is often unique designs you won’t find in other jewels.

The way it rings: Nephrite rings like a bell when struck. Artisans have created chimes, xylophones and gongs from melodically resonant jade.

Joys of Jade

The Three Cs (and Two Ts) of Jade

  • Color: For both jadeite and nephrite, green is the most valued color. The finest jadeite — almost transparent with a vibrant emerald-green color — is known as “imperial jade.”
  • Cut: While jade is rarely faceted like other gems, plain as well as intricate jade carvings are judged by their artistry.
  • Carat weight: Jadeite is generally sold by the piece rather than by weight. For top-quality imperial jadeite, slight size differences can make for large value differences.
  • Transparency: Jadeite’s transparency ranges from completely opaque to semi-transparent. The best jadeite is semi-transparent.
  • Texture: Jadeite has a smooth, even texture that makes people want to touch and hold the gem.

To see our collection of extraordinary jade pieces, visit Eiseman Jewels at NorthPark Center in Dallas.

 

burle marx

The Burle Marx brothers, Roberto and Haroldo, each excelled in creative fields. During the course of their collaboration, which stretched from the 1940s to the 1980s, Roberto Burle Marx acted as designer, while Haroldo was a gemologist who was celebrated for the unique cut of his stones and who pioneered the use of Brazilian gems carved like abstract, organic sculpture. Today, we believe that Burle Marx jewelry deserves rediscovery on a large scale.

The Burle Marx brothers approached jewelry design much like architect would, drafting drawings and making scale models for each of their creations. Inspired by Brazil’s landscapes, oceans, beaches, minerals and gemstones, they drew on the country’s natural beauty to create one-of-a-kind jewelry. Their pieces celebrate Brazil’s abundance of colored gemstones, such as aquamarine, tourmaline, topaz, garnet, quartz, citrine, amethyst, chalcedony, amazonite and emerald.

Burle Marx

The Burle Marx brothers were masters of a style called the forma livre (free-form) cut, which transformed Brazilian semi-precious gems into architectural elements of the jewelry. Burle Marx jewels are completely handmade with absolutely no pre-casting. Their jewelry captures a curvaceous movement that evokes the rhythmic energy of Brazil’s Samba dance. The forms are at once organic and architectural, characterized by a timelessness that reflects the era of Cleopatra while also complementing the fashions of today.

The Burle Marx brand has been such a part of the rich cultural Brazilian tradition that it was often commissioned by the Brazilian government to make jewelry pieces for visiting dignitaries, such as the Queen of England, the former Empress of Iran, Pope John Paul II, Princess Michiko Shoda of Japan, Indira Gandhi and many other important world political figures.

burle marx

Today, Burle Marx is run by Haroldo, and the jeweler’s influence can continue to be seen in Brazilian jewelry to this day. Haroldo Burle Marx has said: “I like to think that I’m a small link in pioneering jewelry concepts in finding new roads, although I deeply respect the old roads.”

To see our stunning selection of Burle Marx estate designs, visit Eiseman Jewels at NorthPark Center in Dallas.

David Webb

Known as “America’s Quintessential Jeweler,” David Webb was a creative visionary whose bold, beautiful statement pieces have been highly sought-after by everyone from socialites to movie stars. Long after his passing, Webb’s legacy continues to make an impact on the jewelry and fashion worlds.

When Webb was just nine years old, he was introduced to metalwork and quickly developed a passion for jewelry-making. He eventually apprenticed at his uncle’s factory, and at 17, he moved from South Carolina to New York City to pursue his craft full-time. At 23, he opened the doors to his flagship store on Manhattan’s Madison Avenue. It would go on to become one of the greatest luxury jewelry houses in America. Just two years later, his jewelry was featured on the cover of Vogue Magazine. And the rest, as they say, is history.

David Webb

Best known for his animal designs, Webb’s jewelry was recognizable for its decorative, bold use of color and impeccable attention to detail. His design influences ranged from his boyhood memories of the South to his explorations of faraway places and ancient cultures. He excelled in his use of yellow gold, diamonds and semi-precious stones to bring the creations of his imagination to life.

David Webb

Webb’s iconic jewelry has been worn by everyone from Hollywood A-listers to American royalty since the brand was founded in the late 1940s. Some of his clients included Ava Gardner, Grace Kelly, Estée Lauder, Lana Turner, Jackie Kennedy and even generations of Vanderbilts and Rockefellers. Elizabeth Taylor featured four pages of David Webb jewelry in the photo book of her famous collection, “My Love Affair with Jewelry.” And Diana Vreeland, the legendary editor of Harper’s Bazaar, was rarely seen without her favorite David Webb zebra bangle.

More recently, you’ll spot stars like Jennifer Lawrence, Eva Mendez, Jennifer Garner and Cameron Diaz wearing Webb’s jewelry to Hollywood parties, award shows and galas.

David Webb Estate at Eiseman Jewels

David Webb

David Webb left behind an incredibly rich and diverse archive of bold, beautiful and intricate jewelry that continues to be treasured by new generations of jewelry enthusiasts. At Eiseman Jewels, we have a stunning collection of vintage David Webb pieces in stock in our Estate Collection. Our current pieces include an eye-catching 18-karat yellow gold, emerald and diamond Tuscan-style cocktail ring, as well as an intricate 18-karat yellow gold grasshopper brooch made with emeralds, diamonds and enamel.

While our customers were once required to visit us at our location in NorthPark Center in Dallas to browse our collection of estate jewelry, we’re happy to announce that you can now conveniently view our Estate Collection online.

Or, if you prefer to view our unique selection of David Webb estate designs — or any other pieces in our Estate Collection — in person, visit Eiseman Jewels at NorthPark Center in Dallas.

 

pearls

Pearls have come a long way since our grandmothers wore them. From edgy earrings to funky statement rings, today’s artful designs go beyond the standard pearl necklace. The stunning array of different pearl varieties available on the market today — including new colors, styles and shapes — have garnered a whole new generation of pearl fans.

Here’s a look at a few of the reasons why pearls are experiencing a modern renaissance.

Pearl History and Lore

Pearls have captivated the human imagination and functioned as symbols of wealth and status for thousands of years. A Chinese historian recorded the oldest written mention of natural pearls in 2206 BC. Today, they remain treasured gems to be passed down from generation to generation.

In ancient civilizations, pearls symbolized the moon and were believed to hold magical properties. Thousands of years ago, Chinese civilizations thought that wearing pearls protected against fire and dragons. During the Victorian era, small pearls were used in mourning jewelry to symbolize tears. Pearls have also been known to symbolize fertility, loyalty, modesty, chastity, purity and friendship over the years.

Types Of Pearls

South Sea

Some of the most sought-after organic gems on the market, South Sea pearls are coveted due to their impressive size — some are as large as 20 millimeters — and thick nacre, the iridescent outer coating that makes pearls so captivating.

Baroque and Semi-Baroque

pearls

Photo Courtesy of Seaman Schepps.

Baroque pearls are pearls that are irregularly or oddly shaped rather than round. Semi-Baroque pearls are only slightly irregular in shape (oval-shaped, for instance).

Natural

Natural pearls are formed without human intervention and are extremely rare.

Cultured

As opposed to natural pearls, cultured pearls are grown in pearl farms. A technician implants the mother-of-pearl bead nucleus into a mollusk through a delicate surgical procedure. The mollusk is then returned to the water and cared for while the pearl forms.

Freshwater

pearlsFreshwater pearls are grown in freshwater lakes, rivers and ponds, predominately in China. They come in a wide range of colors and shapes.

Saltwater

Saltwater pearls are created by oysters in oceans from such places as Thailand, Australia, Indonesia and Tahiti. Saltwater pearls range from 2 to 10 millimeters in size and are usually round and white or cream.

The world’s most popular saltwater pearls are Akoya cultured pearls, which are grown in Japanese and Chinese waters inside Akoya oysters. They come in a variety of colors, from rose and silvery white to cream, gold or bluish grey.

Keshi

Keshi pearls are a shape rather than a type of pearl. They aren’t found in large quantities and are extremely rare. They’re formed when the oyster rejects and spits out the implanted nucleus before the culturing process is complete. The result is a pearl without a nucleus — one that’s 100 percent nacre.

Pearls and Modern Jewelry Production Methods

Eiseman16107_10-21 15 - pearls

Today, computer-aided-design (CAD) 3D modeling allows jewelry designers to see a design in its finished state before the piece is actually made to ensure everything is just right. With CAD, we can design pieces — including custom pearl pieces — specifically to the size of the pearl or gem to increase accuracy and reduce production time and waste. It also gets you, the customer, involved in the design process in a much more intimate way, and that translates to a higher degree of personal expression in the finished custom piece.

For a beautiful selection of pearl jewelry or to inquire about designing your own, visit Eiseman Jewels at NorthPark Center in Dallas.

repurposing jewelry

Are you holding on to jewelry that you’ve inherited but which never seems to leave your jewelry box? You don’t wear it because it’s not your style, but you don’t want to get rid of it because of its sentimental value.

Let Eiseman Jewels take that jewelry and create a truly original and unique new piece that reflects your personal style. We are the Southwest’s most experienced estate jewelry buyers with a combined 100+ years of experience — a trusted name when it comes to your family’s jewelry. And trust is the most important factor in choosing someone to create your custom design.

Here’s how the process works.

repurposing jewelry

• Gather all your old jewelry and bring it to Eiseman Jewels. There, you’ll sit down with an expert jewelry designer to discuss your style and vision for the new piece(s).

repurposing jewelry

• Return to the store to view the 3D drawings of your design. This is the time to be picky. Ask the designer to make any necessary changes so that the finished piece will match your vision. Don’t be afraid to rethink if something’s not working.

repurposing jewelry

• The designer will make any changes and get your final approval before executing the design. The result will be a meaningful, one-of-a-kind piece that you designed yourself.

Some things to keep in mind as you design your new piece:

repurposing jewelry

• There’s often a story behind a piece of heirloom jewelry or special memories of the family member to whom it once belonged. Sharing these stories with your jewelry designer will help inspire their work.

 

• Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Your designer has seen it all when it comes to estate jewelry. They can take your ideas and visualize a finished piece.

repurposing jewelry• Trust your designer’s instincts. They will know what will look best and can guide you through each step of creating a piece of custom jewelry.

• Be patient. Give your designer the necessary time to generate a design from your ideas.

repurposing jewelry

• Use your imagination. Be creative and have fun!

Visit Eiseman Jewels at NorthPark Center in Dallas to talk to a jewelry designer about transforming your old jewelry today.

 

david webb

David Webb was one of the most talented and influential jewelry designers of the 20th century. A handsome, charming Southern gentleman, Webb arrived in New York City from Asheville, North Carolina at just seventeen and picked up a job repairing jewelry in Greenwich Village.

David Webb

The self-taught jeweler went on to work for several large design houses, such as Tiffany & Co. and Harry Winston. In 1948, Webb opened his flagship store on the cosmopolitan Madison Avenue, which would go on to become one of America’s greatest luxury jewelry houses.

Webb approached jewelry as an art, not as a mere product to be bought and sold. His design inspiration came from many sources, including nature and the animal kingdom, and he employed enamel and colored stones to bring the creations of his imagination to life. In addition to his brilliant design sensibilities, Webb was also a master artisan who spent hours sitting with his jewelry craftsmen to make sure every detail of his pieces were perfect.

David Webb

David Webb’s jewelry is iconic and has been adored by socialites and movie stars since the brand was founded. Ava Gardner and Lana Turner proudly wore David Webb jewelry both in movies and in real life. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Grace Kelly and Estée Lauder were also dedicated fans. Elizabeth Taylor featured four pages of David Webb jewelry in the photo book of her famous collection, “My Love Affair with Jewelry.” And Diana Vreeland, the legendary editor of Harper’s Bazaar, was rarely seen without her favorite David Webb zebra bangle.

Although he tragically died of pancreatic cancer at the young age of 50 in 1975, David Webb left behind a rich legacy of design expertise and a diverse catalog of bold, highly detailed jewelry that continues to be treasured by collectors and fashionistas. To this day, his vision and legacy are carefully commemorated in his original Manhattan atelier. While many of David Webb’s competitors outsource their production overseas, at David Webb, every aspect of production takes place under one roof. In fact, the workshop located above the Madison Avenue flagship store is the last of its kind in New York City.

david webb

Original David Webb jewelry still remains highly collectible, but to associate David Webb exclusively with the past would be a mistake. It is currently enjoying a revival among young tastemakers and recently won Gold Design of the Year at The Town & Country 2018 Jewelry Awards.

Peruse our stunning selection of David Webb estate designs at Eiseman Jewels at NorthPark Center in Dallas.